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Pressure Regulators

At EXAIR, a large part of my job is to discuss your applications and make recommendations based upon which of our products would best help your application. In doing so, we always review your air supply to ensure that you have enough air to run our products. For instance you may need an Air Nozzle. This seems simple enough right? Surely you have enough air for this? Well, if you are buying our Atto Super Air Nozzle (left) you probably do, as this is a small nozzle that consumes 2.5 SCFM. However, you may need our large Super Air Nozzle Cluster (right) that will consume 168 SCFM. So as you can see it’s important that we discuss the amount of air you have at the point of use.

Another part of my job is to help customers trouble shoot issues once they have installed our products. I can proudly say that rarely is it an issue with the product itself. The most common cause of malfunction is with the air supply at the point of use. I have seen companies with massive air compressors not be able to supply 30 SCFM. Why? Well just because you have a lot of air coming out of the compressor, doesn’t mean you have a lot of air at the point of use. Other machines and tools down the line, as well as leaks and turns may have depleted the air supply long before it reaches your station for this application. This is the reason why we always recommend our Pressure Regulators with Gauge as seen here:

Pressure Regulators “dial in” performance to get the job done without using more air than necessary.

It’s pretty obvious why we would want you to have a gauge at the point of use, but the importance of the pressure regulator is many times overlooked. Many of our products need to have a certain pressure of air along with the proper SCFM to function efficiently. Some of these are products include some of our Industrial Housekeeping Products and Cabinet coolers. But, many of our products will function perfectly, and even be more efficient for your application with less airflow and psi. To find the best pressure and flow, we use a rule of thumb of starting at 80 psig and dial it back (or up) 5 psig at a time, until the best fit is found.

Most facilities have airlines running throughout, and they are all pushing the same psi and airflow. It is easy to just tap in and drop a line to the new point of use for the new tool. But, if there are 10 machines in line before this one, the air supply at machine 1, is much more than at machine 10. There are also leaks, turns, buildup in the line, and other air flow restrictions that are most likely in the way… This is why you will need a gauge and a pressure regulator at each point of use…

Also, when you drop a line to run a Super Air Knife (or any other EXAIR product) it may be coming off of a 100 psig line. You may only need 40 psi to run this 12″ Super Air knife. At 40 psig you will be pushing 21 SCFM. If this can clean, dry, or move your material as needed, then why use the 100 psig coming from the shop line? At 100 psig, that same 12″ Super Air Knife will use 42 SCFM. That additional SCFM has a rough cost of about $10 per day (running 24 hrs day with cost per kWh at $0.10). As you can see from this simple example, the pressure regulator is a no brainer to save costs and increase efficiency in the product itself.

There are many blogs written about your compressed air being the 3rd to 4th highest utility expense for many companies. In todays economic climate, it is important to use every efficiency possible. Using a regulator is imperative to control any type of flow, be it water, gas, electricity and even – air. Please give us a call to discuss any questions with your next application.

Thank you for stopping by,

Brian Wages

Application Engineer

EXAIR Corporation
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